A Castle, A Church and A Cowslip with Dovegreyreader

My friend Lynne, alias Dovegreyreader, lives not a stone’s throw from Endsleigh and it was my pleasure to spend a day with her during my stay at Pond Cottage.

The Wednesday dawned grey and misty but not deterred we met at the hotel car park and swanned off in her car to Launceston in nearby Cornwall. “We be in Cornwall now” declared Lynne in authentic Cornish accent as we crossed the Tamar bridge that separates it from Devon. During the short journey Lynne pointed out landmarks such as the church at Milton Abbot and other Endsleigh cottages lived in by Horace Adams.

Launceston : ‘a real Cornish town’ says the tourist leaflet picked up at the TIC our first stop in the town. Interestingly, and isn’t always the same when you live somewhere? Lynne had thought she had never been to the Castle; at least not in the last few decades, maybe when the children were very small.

Welcome to L Castle

Welcome to Launceston Castle

“The town is notable for its impressive castle built by Brian de Bretagne, the first Norman Earl of Cornwall. It has never been besieged or captured.” Well, I’m not surprised it’s a short, steep climb up the mound to the keep and the the walls are several feet thick. In fact the steps up to the battlements are built within the thickness of the walls.

The castle is now in the care of English Heritage who have created a small exhibition with displays and information boards that set the scene.

Launceston Castle

 The Approach to Launceston Castle – on a dull day

As with all climbs, it was worth the effort for the views from the top. On a good day they would have been exceptional but on this day we could really only study the town in the foreground.

Launceston from battlements

The View NW from the Battlements – in the foreground on the right is Castle Street. Sir John Betjeman called it “the most perfect collection of 18th century townhouses in Cornwall” the tourist leaflet declares. In the middle in the distance is the location of the Cowslip Workshops which we visited later.

Misty Cornwall from LC

Looking west from the castle to a very misty Cornwall: the Earl’s hunting park stretched towards Bodmin Moor

LC Church from castle

East of the castle is the Church of St Mary Magdalene

In fact the Church was our next port-of-call.

P1150025

A striking brass with inscription commemorating an unidentified 16th century lady

Disturbing memorial

A rather disturbing memorial

Altar tryptich

The Altar Triptych : The Nativity of Our Lord; The Adoration of the Magi; The Presentation of Our Lord in the Temple (sorry photo doesn’t do it justice)

The poet Charles Causley was born in Launceston in 1917 and spent most of his life there. I discovered the Causley Society website which includes his biography and a Causley trail around the town. He wrote a poem about St Mary Magdalene which is available on a little leaflet from the church.

C Causley poem

Mary Magdalene Poem :

Mary, Mary Magdalene
Lying on the wall
I throw a pebble on your back
Will it lie or fall?

A relief of Mary Magdalene is to be found on the east wall of St Mary Magdalene church. It is said that a stone lodged on her back will bring good luck.

Mary Magdalen stained glass

The Mary Magdalene Stained Glass Window

By this time we were ready for something to eat and Lynne drove us out of town to the Cowslip Workshops.

Misty Launceston from Cowslip

View of Launceston from the Cowslip Workshops

Anyone, even the least artistic person, would find something to interest here. The Workshops are based at a very working farm, there’s a café, where we had soup for lunch, sewing classes, a fabric shop which also sells pottery by Nicholas Mossse, a gallery, and a farmhouse/kitchen garden. On a good day there will also be distant views!

Cowslip allotment

The Farmhouse Garden

IMG_0827

Inside the Fabric Shop

Much as we were tempted by the cakes and pastries in the cafe we knew that very soon we would be back at Pond Cottage and tucking in to Bettys Yorkshire treats as Lynne came back with me for tea and to meet my friends. Thanks again, for showing me your local area, Lynne. What a lovely part of the country you live in!

6 comments on “A Castle, A Church and A Cowslip with Dovegreyreader

  1. nilly says:

    Every year we say “We MUST go to Cornwall this year.” but never get further than Devon – this year we really must go. Love the Devon/Cornwall accent! With one dear granny from South Devon and the other from Norwich, and a very bland non-accent myself, I’ve always loved these warm sounds. Which, as you’ve probably noticed, are becoming rarer.

    • I was in Norwich last week and we had some discussions about the Norwich and Norfolk accents being heard less and less around the city. I gave my cousin a book I had called ‘Broad Norfolk’ based on letters to the EDP probably in the 1960s.

  2. Nilly, I have booked a week (with friends) in Cornwall already for next year! Generally, we never get further than Devon either. But that is really because ‘Milord’ holidayed in Cornwall as a youngster and isn’t keen to revisit. We both love Devon and really, it is far enough to drive from Yorkshire anyway, isn’t it?

  3. dovegreyreader says:

    Didn’t we have a lovely day!

  4. […] was my annual Devon outing with Lynne, the dovegreyreader. In past years we’ve met here, here and here. Not forgetting (and I never will) our weekend at Port Eliot last […]

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