Edward Gorey’s Cabinet of Curiosities : The 2017 Edward Gorey House Exhibit

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Map of Cape Cod by Consuelo Joerns, a friend of Edward Gorey, on sale in the shop

On our first return to Cape Cod in 2008, after an interval of  29 years, I discovered The Edward Gorey House and made a visit and posted my photos here. On our last Saturday of this year’s trip, after checking out of our Airbnb in Barnstable, I made a second visit to the house.

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Even if you don’t recognise Gorey’s name you will probably recognise his work. There’s a fairly detailed biographical sketch of him here on the house website. He lived at the house, at Yarmouth, Massachusetts, for the last 20 years of his life. The house is jam-packed full of his stuff and there is also a barn-full next door. Most of his collection of 25,000 books are currently being catalogued and shelved at San Diego State University. His own personal art works are in Hartford, Connecticut.

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A small selection of Gorey’s books is still shelved at the house

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Remember The Dubonnet Queen of Ealing Common?

And see The Scavenger Hunt below : J is for James who took lye by mistake

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A corner of Gorey’s kitchen

And there’s U is for Una who slipped down a drain.

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These Cabinets of Curiosities seem to turn up everywhere this year

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Edward Gorey never threw a ticket away

Note also the Scavenger Hunt and pencil.

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Author Gorey’s own works

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For younger visitors the curators of the house have devised a Scavenger Hunt for the Gashlycrumb Tinies. (See the tickets vitrine above) Well, it’s not really just for children. Anyone can join in.

I spotted :

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A is for Amy who fell down the stairs

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G is for George smothered under a rug

Edward Gorey House is for everyone!

Gerhart-Hauptmann-Haus

Gerhart Hauptmann (1862-1946) is another winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. He was a German novelist, poet and playwright; although he was born and died in what is now Poland. I visited his former summer house on the island of Hiddensee in June.

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The original gate entrance to Gerhard Hauptmann House and Garden

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A Walk Through Huntingdonshire : Villages, Riverside Scenery and Historical Interest

There’s a walk that I’ve been looking forward to doing for several years. I found it when searching for more information about The Manor House, Hemingford Grey the location of Lucy Boston’s book “The Children of Green Knowe”. More recently, I read about Lynne’s visit to The Manor House on her blog The Dovegreyreader Scribbles. The walk appeared to have all the ingredients of a pleasant morning out in the Huntingdonshire countryside. So, as I happened to find myself here in Huntingdon this morning, I decided to try it out.

The 5 mile walk starts from the National Trust car park at Houghton Mill where there’s a Tea Shop and it’s possible to borrow a copy of the walk.

Love Lane

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Lübeck : City of Nobel Prize Winners : Thomas Mann; Willy Brandt; Günter Grass

 

The excellent Buddenbrook Book Shop

Lübeck is proud to claim three Nobel Prize winners among its residents: Thomas Mann (1875-1955) Nobel Prize for Literature in 1929);  Willy Brandt (1913-1992) Nobel Peace Prize in 1971; and Günter Grass (born in Danzig in 1927 died Lübeck 2015) Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999. All three claim this Hanseatic city as their home. The writer Thomas Mann was born here and for the first 18 years of his life called this city on the river Trave his home. The politician Willy Brandt was also born in Lübeck and, similarly, spent his formative years in the Hanseatic city. The author Günter Grass moved to Lübeck at the age of 68 – to be, as he once stated, “closer” to Thomas Mann and Willy Brandt.

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Germany, Bornholm and Sweden : a quick resumé of a three week tour

Where to begin? Where to begin? I arrived home on Wednesday after my wonderful visit to Germany and Scandinavia and now comes the hardest part – sifting through photographs and deciding which to include and which to discard.

Here is just a taster selection and I hope to expand on some of the visits and walks during the next couple of weeks.

At Buddenbrooks House, Lübeck

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Broadstairs on Sea

On the first Friday of February after leaving St Edward’s Presbytery and dropping my sister off at Ramsgate Station I headed to the little seaside resort of Broadstairs. It’s practically part of Ramsgate but definitely a separate place. I liked very much what I saw. I’d always been intrigued by views of the town which show Charles Dickens’s Bleak House on a cliff looking  out to sea. You can see it in the middle of the picture below. There are several Dickens connections in Broadstairs and I probably didn’t see all of them. At that early hour in the morning I was able to park easily near the sea front. As near as you can get by car, anyway. There are pleasant gardens and paths separating the beach from the road and the main streets and narrow lanes behind.

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Broadstairs Beach

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