Edward Gorey’s Cabinet of Curiosities : The 2017 Edward Gorey House Exhibit

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Map of Cape Cod by Consuelo Joerns, a friend of Edward Gorey, on sale in the shop

On our first return to Cape Cod in 2008, after an interval of  29 years, I discovered The Edward Gorey House and made a visit and posted my photos here. On our last Saturday of this year’s trip, after checking out of our Airbnb in Barnstable, I made a second visit to the house.

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Even if you don’t recognise Gorey’s name you will probably recognise his work. There’s a fairly detailed biographical sketch of him here on the house website. He lived at the house, at Yarmouth, Massachusetts, for the last 20 years of his life. The house is jam-packed full of his stuff and there is also a barn-full next door. Most of his collection of 25,000 books are currently being catalogued and shelved at San Diego State University. His own personal art works are in Hartford, Connecticut.

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A small selection of Gorey’s books is still shelved at the house

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Remember The Dubonnet Queen of Ealing Common?

And see The Scavenger Hunt below : J is for James who took lye by mistake

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A corner of Gorey’s kitchen

And there’s U is for Una who slipped down a drain.

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These Cabinets of Curiosities seem to turn up everywhere this year

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Edward Gorey never threw a ticket away

Note also the Scavenger Hunt and pencil.

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Author Gorey’s own works

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For younger visitors the curators of the house have devised a Scavenger Hunt for the Gashlycrumb Tinies. (See the tickets vitrine above) Well, it’s not really just for children. Anyone can join in.

I spotted :

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A is for Amy who fell down the stairs

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G is for George smothered under a rug

Edward Gorey House is for everyone!

Charlotte Berlin’s Museum

The first stop on our Historical Walk Through Ystad should have been at Charlotte Berlin’s Museum but when we arrived the Museum hadn’t opened so we resolved to return a bit later and reserve places on the 11 o’clock tour. This largely intact ‘mansion’ [according to the leaflet; but really it’s just a typical Ystad brightly painted, single storey house with first floor rooms in the high-pitched roof] offers an opportunity to view and gain insight into a Swedish 19th century home and its owner.

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Last Day on Rügen : Kap Arkona, Altenkirchen and Gingst

 

On our last day we had make the difficult decision as to what we would do and where we would go. We still had several “must-sees” on our list. In the end we settled on heading to the very northern tip of Rügen to visit two famous lighthouses and walk to the picturesque fishing village of Vitt. We would then drive and walk to a Neolithic burial ground (Nobbin). Travelling via the village of Altenkirchen we would then take the car Wittower car ferry over the Breetzer Bodden and finally visit the village of Gingst with its handicrafts museum, cafe and bookshop.

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We caught the little road train from Putgarten to Cap Arkona

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Gerhart-Hauptmann-Haus

Gerhart Hauptmann (1862-1946) is another winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. He was a German novelist, poet and playwright; although he was born and died in what is now Poland. I visited his former summer house on the island of Hiddensee in June.

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The original gate entrance to Gerhard Hauptmann House and Garden

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A Walk Through Huntingdonshire : Villages, Riverside Scenery and Historical Interest

There’s a walk that I’ve been looking forward to doing for several years. I found it when searching for more information about The Manor House, Hemingford Grey the location of Lucy Boston’s book “The Children of Green Knowe”. More recently, I read about Lynne’s visit to The Manor House on her blog The Dovegreyreader Scribbles. The walk appeared to have all the ingredients of a pleasant morning out in the Huntingdonshire countryside. So, as I happened to find myself here in Huntingdon this morning, I decided to try it out.

The 5 mile walk starts from the National Trust car park at Houghton Mill where there’s a Tea Shop and it’s possible to borrow a copy of the walk.

Love Lane

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Lübecker Museen : The Behnhaus-Drägerhaus and The Europäisches Hansemuseum

The Behnhaus-Drägerhaus Museum was totally unknown to me before my visit to Lübeck : but what a gem! Quite a big gem, actually. Just a few doors along Königstrasse from Willy Brandt House at numbers 9 to 11 the Museum/Gallery is housed in two adjoining classical mansions.

Here is a link to a very brief glimpse of the character of the museum.

http://www.3sat.de/mediathek/?mode=play&obj=59007

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